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to become law, it would have to pass the republican-controlled house of representatives. speaker boehner will allow it to come up with a vote. we want to talk about this. joining us from maryland, the democratic state senator of montgomery county and corey stewart, republican chairman of the prince william county bord of supervisors. chairman stewart, i want to start with you. you have been a longtime voice on the immigration debate, saying mainly that local and state governments have carried the bulk of issues. how do you see this today? is the federal government stepping up in your view? >> the federal government has no credibility with regard to immigration reform and enforcement. why would we believe that washington is going to enforce new immigration law if it's not enforcing the current law? every day, thousands of criminal illegal aliens are aphandied -- apprehended by local law enforcement, they contact i.c.e. and i.c.e. directs them to release the criminal aliens. there is no reason to believe that if we pass the reform willing, they're going to change anything, they're going to
organic law. and saying that the constitution could not possibly have anticipated our every governing question. i invite you to imagine if you will, just close your eyes and just imagine the right wing outcry. if president obama called the constitution organic law. instead of saying this. liberals have always understood that, they understood it when president lincoln said it and when president obama said it. but conservatives have never, ever understood that when times change, so must we. and the day conservatives actually do understand that, they will no longer be conservatives. >>> obama land. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. yesterday we discovered the obama doctrine. put simply, it's to continue the american revolution well into the 21st century. defined economic equality for women, full equality all out for gay people. and full political and financial opportunity for people of color. everything about yesterday screamed with this manifesto from the makeup of the crowd to the people in the inaugural platf
anyone else under the law, for if we are truly created equal, then surely the love we commit to one another must be equal as well. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. our journey is not complete until we find a better way to welcome the striving, hopeful immigrants who still see america as a land of opportunity. until bright young students and engineers are enlisted in our workforce rather than expelled from our country. >> there's grievance there, not just rights. people waiting in line. i said this before, i was lucky to be there when south africans first got the vote, all south africans, and they waited for four or five hours, and i thought that was unbelievable. and then to watch people in america, in this advanced society of democracy, having to wait eight hours. it looked like a punitive action by republicans, to be blunt about it, from state legislatures and big capital cities that decided, you know what? let's make it hard for these people. maybe we can cut down that vote. >> that's one of those great underr
with the a ministration. the pendant that was put into the law when there were set up which made them an independent voice cannot sell rights, it was really important. they should not try to be friendly with some particular administration. their job was to be a watchdog. a watchdog over with the demonstration was doing. and they learned that. and then when kennedy was assassinated and johnson was uprose civil-rights because of that the civil rights act of '64 and '65, actually enacted into law. >> of a point did you become aware in your life of the civil rights commission? >> i became aware of them when i was in the graduate program university. asked if i work on a project. >> sixty's, 70's. >> yes. i used some of the reports because the reports they did were very good reports. some of the historical research that i did. so i was very much aware of them. finally by the time the commission as to me since i've do legal and constitutional history file would read something of a history of abortion rights for them and how that all played out and what the history had been all the way back to england and so on.
-slaveholders and slaveholders alike were basically loyal law abiding citizen who were being tricked or anti-secession and minority of extremists. leaving slavery allowed would hopefully when i'm back. that's the expectation. but after a full year of war and despite lincoln effort to spare their property and spare their feelings, precious few slaveowners producing any active sympathy to the union or union policies. this lack of support is supposedly prounion slaveowners isolde marbury son in the light at the bad news that was around that time coming from the virginia battlefield of 1862. meanwhile, it is painfully clear that confederate armies were everywhere benefiting greatly from the forced labor performed for them by slaves, and placing artillery and this sketch comic you read to be sick and wounded, tending horses, cooking and cleaning, raising the push for the population and the army. more and more republican leaders now therefore concluded that attempting to fight the war without offending the end he was impossible. concluded on the contrary that union armies must become more aggressi
're doing it. surprise. michigan is amazing, right? michigan is the state with the republican law to let the state fire all your locally elected officials and unilaterally abolish your town if they want to on their own say so, n no mar how you vote. michigan laws repealed that with a direct that. governor snyder and the republicans gave the michigan voters a one-finger salute. decided to pass and sign into law a new emergency manager law. this new one can't be killed by the voters. what's that you say? the will of the who? have we met? you know the funny videos about the honey badgers and how they don't give a [ bleep ]. michigan republicans do not care what anything thinks of them, certainly not the press, and apparently not the voters, michigan, my personal nominee for the one state that is shameless enough to actually do what a whole host of other states finally today are starting to get too embarrassed to go ahead with. usually the outliar in american normal politics is florida, right? florida is usually the weird state. sad, scary, and florida. you click on the florida tab, and you
majorities sensible and strengthening the current gun laws. what they support, 82% of gun owners, 72% of members actually support universal background checks. we are trying to keep guns and weapons out of the hands of dangerous people, criminals, and the seriously mentally ill. when you talk to people in west virginia, gun owners themselves want to be able to have guns in their homes. they also want to ensure that those guns do not fall into the hands of people who should not have them. the other constituency that is important is law enforcement. they are unanimous in their support for assault weapon ban for capacity magazines and closing loopholes. host: gun control could split obama, reid. they say backing restrictions could hurt the senate leader and other democrats. this story points out that for some democrats up for reelection, supporting the president will be treacherous terrain. they go on to talk about facing reelection battles in states where gun control is politically unpopular making potential votes on the proposals problematic. what might the strategy be at your organiza
michigan is the state with the republican law to let the state fire all your locally elected officials and unilaterally abolish your town if they want to on their own say so, no matter how you vote. in november this past election, michigan voters repealed that with a direct vote, the will of the people. the month after that, governor snyder and the republicans in the legislature gave the voters of michigan a big michigan republican one-finger salute. they decided to pass and sign into law a new emergency manager law to replace the one that the voters just killed. except this new one can't be killed by the voters. what's that you say? the will of the who now? i'm sorry, have we met? you know those really funny videos about the honey badger and about how the honey badger don't give a bleep? michigan republicans are the honey badgers of politics. they do not give a bleep. because michigan republicans do not care what anyone thinks of them, certainly not the press, but apparently also not the voters, michigan is my personal nominee. michigan is my nominee for the one state that is shameles
law that was passed in '94 and expired in 2004, is leading today's charge. she, along with other senators, even displaying an array of assault weapons that would be banned and they brought props. senator feinstein arguing why is she believes there's a need for this ban. >> since the last assault weapons ban expired in 2004, and incidentally, in the ten years it was in place, no one took it to court. more than 350 people have been killed with assault weapons. >> megyn: no one took it to court because the nra at the time felt the supreme court was not leaning their way on these types of issues. the looks different it the court back then and the court today, there's question, if the bill would pass, there's question whether it would pass in the democratically controlled senate and whether the nra would feel the same. and on far-reaching rules of this legislation and the hurdles that have be to be cleared before this thing can pass. we're also hearing new questions today about secretary of state hillary clinton's highly charged testimony yesterday about the deadly terror attack on ou
now set to announce a framework that could bring sweeping changes in our immigration laws and this would be historic. we'll see if they get it done though. hope the weekend was fantastic. >> it was. how about yours? bill: decent. martha: happy monday, good morning, everybody. i'm martha maccallum. the details of this bill need to be worked out. the senators want to cover four main goals in this. it includes something you heard a lot about, a path to citizenship for the 11 million immigrants already living here. and the establishment of a employment verification program to prevent employers from hiring illegal immigrants. something like that already exists. they want to do changes to that. also an agricultural worker program in this country. bill: steve centanni, leads our coverage. he is live in washington. what happens exactly today, steve? good morning. >> reporter: well, good morning, bill. a bipartisan group of eight senators will unveil its new immigration proposal here on capitol hill. it is a plan as you said that lays out a path to citizenship for 11 million undocu
for this short-term extension is to just get congress to actually follow the law that congress wrote in 1974 which is to pass a budget by april 15. we're not saying what kind of budget they have to pass. just pass a budget. reason is the senate is going on four years now for not having passed a budget. we think this gives us the time we need in this nation to have a good thorough, vigorous and honest debate of what it takes to get our fiscal house in order and about how to budget. families budget. businesses budget. our federal government should budget. we actually have a law that says we should budget. all we're saying is follow that law and that's why the short- term extension before you today. i'll let the rest of it speak for itself. >> thank you very much. mr. levin. >> first, welcome, mr. chairman. >> thank you. i think this is the first -- >> i think this is the first time i have been before you. the first time any of us has been in the chair. >> thank you. i hope i'll do good enough and make you want to come back. >> i'll come back whether i want to or not. \[laughter] >> we still we
of the governor and the mayor. big corporate donors, big business owners. they are so many laws -- there are so many laws. they treat you like slaves. host: how is the issue of immigration factoring into what is happening in texas? if we expect the president to make remarks on immigration in las vegas this week. caller: it falls back on the standard of living. it does not matter if you are an immigrant or not. if you are a person that is living in the country that does not provide the wealth to keep your family strong, and at the same time enough money that the government -- every week. host: thank you for your call. the highest salary is $179,000. the lowest is in maine for $70,000. the average governor salary is $130,000. billy is up next in florida on the independent line. caller: hello. i was watching the local news the other day in florida. they had gov. scott in tallahassee saying they had not see an -- they had not seen any money for the medicare program. >> what did you make of that? caller: i think they are in trouble. i am 75 years old and i have lost my medicare coverage. host: are y
of senators about to announce a plan to rewrite our nation's immigration law and provide a pathway to citizenship for millions of illegal immigrants. good morning i'm jon scott. jamie: i'm jamie colby, in for jenna lee. jon: welcome. jamie: thank you. the plan includes measures to strengthen our border security, and will improve they say the illegal immigration process and include an effective ememployment verification system to insure employers do not hire undocumented workers. more importantly, this addresses what happens to the estimate the 11 million immigrants, could be more, that are already here. all this is the result of months of work by eight senators, four republicans, four democrats, as bipartisan as it gets. chief political correspondent carl cameron live on cap hole capitol hill this morning. good morning. >> reporter: jamie this is a big deal on the eve of president's big immigration proposal set in las vegas. this represents a group of bipartisan u.s. senators effectively laying down their marker on the president's proposal. and it is a sweeping one that has biparti
. and later, live coverage of a forum examining a law passed in 2005 that sets minimum standards for driver's licenses and state-issued id documents. >> now, a group of journalists discuss the 2012 elections and the future of the republican party. they comment on why mitt romney lost the presidential election and the strategies republicans should utilize to appeal to a wider range of voters. among the participants are weekly standard editor bill kristol and msnbc host and former congressman joe scarborough. this forum was part of a conference hosted by the national review institute that examined the future of conservativism. it runs about 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> hi, everyone. wow, wow. incredibly loud, louder than i thought. apologize. i apologize to your eardrums. i'm with national review, and this is our panel on what's wrong with the right. it's going to take the next 72 hours, so i hope you all have provisions for the next couple of days. i'm here with john pod hotter and bill kristol, founder and editor of "the weekly standard," and we're going to get right into it. jo
about what he called our generation's task which was equal pay, gay marriage, repeal of voter i.d. laws, immigration reform and gun control. you know, everything but deficit, debt, spending and the america's economy. jobs and the economy was passed by rather quickly. we're in an economic recovery. that was about it. so, yeah, i think congressman ryan called it right. the president's agenda at least from the state of the union address was overwhelmingly liberal and not connected at all to deficit, debt, spending and america's economy and jobs. this is a legitimate disagreement between the two parties and legitimate disagreement between his president and the republican opponents on what the priorities ought to be but it is pretty clear what the president's priorities were. jon: this president racked up a lot of debt in first four years in office and got reelected. maybe he is assuming that the american people are fine with going the way it has been going? >> well i think, he talked about cutting the deficit during the campaign, promised that he would cap $2.50 in spending cuts for every d
concerned we are about these guys lead to legislation which led to law to something that needed a solution. this is the way that it needs to go. it sometimes seems impossible, but it worked, it worked for the chimps the least. now it is time for the last word this is the way that it needs to go. it sometimes seems impossible, but it worked, it worked for the chimps the least. . >>> happy friday. right now on "first look," hazardous windchills and frostbite with serious concerns in parts of the country this morning. >>> today vice president biden takes his gun violence message on the word after senator feinstein works to ban assault weapons and other weapons. but the nra says not so fast. >>> a new stomach bug is called the ferrari of viruses. and u.s. health officials say it's taking over the country. >>> all that and manti te'o's bizarre explanation. destruction for safety's sake. and we'll take you to a place where the sun is warm and life is good. good morning. i'm meraryo mara schiavocampo. rivers are freezing in the boston area and in massachusetts, amazing pictures show ri
and puts dangerous weapons into the hands of criminals who essentially don't follow the law, something else that could be part of this legislation is creating a registry for any weapons that were obtained before this ban goes in place, and a speech this week one of the nra's eleader's's wayne lapierre says that was totally unacceptable to the nra. >> dianne feinstein's conference is scheduled for 11:00 a.m. eastern, about two hours from now. >>> the military is making a major change, for the first time in history women will be allowed to serve on the front lines but don't expect to see changes right away. pentagon correspondent chris lawrence tells us why. >> reporter: army infantry, marine recon, even special ops, on thursday, they all opened to women for the first time. the pentagon is eliminating its ban on women in combat, but there's a catch. did you know today's army would be so different than the one you joined? >> no. >> reporter: staff sergeant kelly rodriguez deployed three times to iraq and afghanistan and became one of the first female combat medics to work directly with special
of congress, fogs, members of the executive branch the bodyguard of the people who make our laws. the bottom line, the people who are banning ordinary americans from owning these weapons will be protected by people carrying the weapons. >> a weird double standard and specifically this legislation would do this, let's put out exactly what it would do, and we have that here. so this is the-- it would prohibit the sale, manufacture and transporttation of 157 more commonly-- it would have the magazine owes of ten rounds. >> that's something-- >> we saw similar to that in new york state the passing that andrew cuomo just passed, seven rounds and police are upset about that and they're having to remove three rounds of the chambers of their magazines so that they don't violate the very law. >> well, in new york state there was an apartmently an oversight in writing the law that did not exempt law enforcement from it and that's going to be changed. bottom line we've been told repeatedly by the vice-president and many others in the administration, you don't need these weapons to defend yourself. a sh
me in supporting these important bills to reform our campaign finance laws and assure that corporate rights do not trumps people's rights. thank you. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the chair recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. griffith, for five minutes. mr. griffith: thank you, mr. speaker. i rise and submit remarks in honor of virginia state trooper, jay, a devoted public servant, who along with trooper battle, saved a family of three from a house fire in saltville, virginia. when i first learned lerned of the bravery, news reports failed to involve his involvement. on january 2, i spoke of this incident and only mentioned trooper battle. however, both men are deserving of our recognition. . to recap in the early hours of friday, december 28, 2012, trooperer if lapd and battle were in search of a stolen car that had been involved in an earlier police chase. when they noticed off in the distance an orange shoe, they decided to investigate. when they reached the area in question, much to their s
, because i agree with you, there ought to be given more leeway, but under current law, they were limited. host: secretary clinton before the house foreign affairs committee. your reaction from the testimony. chesapeake, virginia, pamela, independent line. caller: i'm glad to be on your show. host: glad to have you on. go ahead. caller: i have a couple of comments. regarding the republicans, their aggressiveness towards secretary clinton and their questioning i thought was appropriate for the crimes that were committed. however, on the other side of the aisle, the democrats were too accommodating and skirting the issues of the crime committed. and i think that that shows total bipartisan problems. it shows that there is still a total political posture. i think if you watched from the perspective of the viewer from television, secretary clinton each time she was questioned by a democrat, smiled and smiled with lots of gleam in her eye towards them. whereas with the republicans questioning, there was not that smile, there was not that pleasure of questioning. and the reason being is because
with the breaking news. according to a source from the hill and also law enforcement source the inspector general has finished its report on the secret service scandal and specifically the secret service's own investigation into that scandal. we are told that that report will be sent to the hill a little later on today. it includes the agency did implement proper reforms. that is what we are being told at this point in time, but, again, andrea, this is developing. there are a lot of moving parts. we will undoubtedly learn more as the day goes on. in terms of denis mcdonough, president obama did announce today that denis mcdonough will become his new chief of staff. he is one of the president's most trusted aides, most recently serving as the deputy national security advisor, but he has advised the president really for the past decade going all the way back to when president obama was a senator, he was also advising him when president obama first ran for president back in 2008. this is someone who has built up a lot of trust here among staffers m white house. he has helped advise president obama o
. here's the point. we have a law. it's tchailed budget act. it requires that congress passes a budget. by april 15. all we're saying is congress, follow the law. do your work. budget. and the reason for this extension is so that we can have the debate we need to have. it's been a one-sided debate. the house of representatives has passed budgets. the other body, the senate, hasn't passed a budget for almost four years. we owe our constituents more than that. we owe them solutions. and when both parties put their solutions on the table, then we can have a good, clear debate about how to solve the problem. because the problem is not going away, no matter how much we can wish it away. the problem of debt, of deficit, of a debt crisis is here. we owe it to our children and grandchildren, we owe it to our constituents, to fix this this isn't a republican or a democrat thing. this is a math thing. and the math is vicious. and it's hurting our country. and it's hurting the next generation. and it's hurting our economy. and the sooner we can solve this problem, the better off everybody is goin
. in the last 40 years one of the biggest changes had been state laws, just in the last couple of years there have been 135 new restrictions mainly by republican legislators on abortion and that has some pro choice activists concerned. they say the big issue is now access. our latest nbc/wall street journal poll shows public opinion is still firmly behind roe v. wade with seven out of ten saying it should be the law of the land. those who disagree will be on the mall today. thousands of them, and among the speakers republican house speaker john boehner and former republican presidential candidate rick santorum. >> thank you. >>> manti te'o speaks in his first on-camera interview since the girlfriend hoax story broke. thursday, te'o told katie couric he was absolutely not in on the prank. and that he was a victim. he admitted to misleading journalists by sticking to the story after the fact saying he was scared. te'o played couric a voice mail message left to him by the unidentified woman. >> hi, i'm just letting you know i got here and i'm getting ready for my first session and just wan
and attorney general eric holder involved. the push back against the proposed virginia law was swift and it was loud, and it made a difference. one republican senator already said that she will not support the bill. today another republican joined her, calling it a bad idea. and in a senate with a 20-20 split, these two votes make a big difference. virginia governor bob mcdonnell, he saw the writing on the wall. he rejected the bill through a spokesperson. the governor does not support this legislation. he believes virginia's existing system works just fine as it is. he does not believe there is any need for a change. so the reaction scared off republican lawmakers down in the state of florida, who were trying to pass a similar law. the gop, speaker of that house in florida said today i don't think we need to change the rules of the game. i think we need to get better. amen to that if you're a republican. but this is all good news if you're a lefty. but it's no time for democrats to ease up at all. republicans are not going to surrender easily. molly ball from "the atlantic" reported
congressman learned from the election defeat and why the battle over the president's health care law may just be beginning. >> also, a developing situation in egypt. dozens are dead, nearly two dozen more sentenced to hang. the military struggling to keep order an egypt's president meeting with his top generals. >> rick: the latest in smartphone technology, "consumer reports" is here to tell us which new advances you may want and the costly bells and whistles you should try to avoid. ♪ >> arthel: we begin with the dangerous weather system bringing new troubles, ice and freezing rain making its way across the country, right now. causing serious problems on the roads, drivers are coping the best they can and out right treacherous conditions, there have been thousands of wrecks on highways across the affected areas including north carolina where large sections of i-40 and i-85 have slowed to a crawl. >> i don't think i've ever gotten stuck like this before. >> it is awful. >> you can't drive in it at all. >> it was bumper to bumper. >> scary stuff, no doubt. but it is winter and, even though n
laws restricting abortion. there are now 17 states that pay for abortion for low income women and of course federal funds are restricted there. wae continue for s we continue to see demonstrations on both sides. but public opinion is pretty clear. 7 out of 10 said they want roe vs. wade abortion rights to remain the law of the land. today in addition to those thousands of people from around the country who plan to attend the event on the national mall, house speaker john boehner will be speaking, as well. >> tracie potts live in washington. thanks so much. >>> manti te'o speaks. in his first on camera interview since the hoax story broke, he told katie couric he was not in on the prank and that he was a victim. he admitted to misleading journalists by sticking to the story after the fact saying he doesn't know what to do. te'o even played a voice mail message left for him by the unidentified woman. >> i'm just letting you know i got here and i'm getting ready for my first session and just calling to keep you posted. i miss you. i love you. bye. >> te'o also addressed questions
in the crowd taking the first steps in a long push to reform the nation's gun laws. as the protesters dispersed today, they looked ahead to wednesday, the first congressional hearings for legislation on gun control. the head of the nra, wayne lapierre and the husband of gabby giffords, mark kelly, will testify. david? >> along with them so many of those families from newtown. reena, thank you. >>> another image from washington making headlines tonight, president obama in his first joint interview with someone other than his wife, instead hillary clinton, when you think back, the two battling it out in the democratic primary nearly five years ago, making history coming down to the two of them. then going on to form quite an alliance, the connection behind the scenes and in front of the cameras. right here, as they observed the bodies of those diplomats brought home from libya. tonight, why the president decided to sit down with hillary clinton now. is it about a campaign that's yet to come? here's abc's david kerley. >> i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretaries of state we've
's called bibles, badges and business. it's a group of church leaders, including evangelical pastor, law enforcement officials and small business leaders that will press for immigration reform on the local level, the grassroots level, and some of these grassroots leaders, as well as other advocates, con firmed to me that the white house has its own legislation, its own immigration reform bill, that it has been writing for some time now, very detailed, but it is unclear whether that will ever see the light of day, wolf, now that the senate has come out with its own proposal, wolf. >> dana, is it an accident that the senators were unveiling their plan on this day? >> no, it's not. it's because of what jessica was talking about. the president planning a major address on this issue tomorrow. i am told by multiple sources in both parties that these bipartisan senators wanted to get out today in order to signal to everybody out there, but perhaps most importantly, to republicans who may be on the fence about supporting a bipartisan effort, that this is independent of what the president is doin
laws. they looked ahead to wednesday, the first congressional hearings for legislation on gun control. the head of the nra and the husband of gabby giffords, mark kelly, will testify. david? >> along with them so many of those families from newtown. >>> another image from washington, president obama in his first joint interview with someone other than his wife, instead hillary clinton, the two battling it out in the democratic primary. making history coming down to the two of them. they formed an alliance. behind the scenes and in front of the cameras. right here, as they observed the bodies the brought home from libya. is it about a campaign that's yet to come? here's abc's david kerlekerley. >> i think hillary will go down as one of the finest secretaries of state we've had. >> reporter: a first -- a dual interview with the president -- who told cbs' "60 minutes" why he wanted to sit with hillary clinton. >> i want the country to appreciate what an extraordinary role she's played during the course of my administration. >> reporter: a remarkable conclusion to a relationship no-holds-
: coming up, he was once in charge of enforcing the strictest gun laws in the country. so why does our next guest say the president's gun plan might fuelly help criminals? >> steve: that's right. then does this scene look familiar? is this victoria secret super model trying out to be the next pond girl? >> gretchen: i just bought that swim suit. seriously. the boys use capital one venture miles for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. but for most of us it represents something more. it's the time of year that we have all waited for. when we sit on the edge of our seats for four quarters. it represents players reaching a childhood dream. the biggest stage there is in sports. a time when legacies are made. where a magical play can happen every snap, and you rem
and michigan have passed right to work laws and in illinois we're still beholden to the government employee unions that these politicians refuse to reform the 200 billion pension crisis we're under. stuart: ted. >> we've got to go for big fixes. stuart: right now i want to just concentrate on chicago for a second. >> okay. stuart: i'm told that the mayor, rahm emanuel, he's got a commission looking into the city's finances and that commission suggests that he they should shift their retiree health costs for the city of chicago, shift them onto the the backs of the federal taxpayer. i believe that is a proposal which may be coming in chicago. i say that that is a back door obama bailout of its former home town and former state. what do you say? >> stuart, i think you're right. two ways to look at this. on the one hand, chicago has no business paying for cadillac health care plans and retirees in the 50's. and no one in the private sector gets that kind of perk. on the other hand rahm emanuel is doing this because he know he can get away with it and dump a lot of people on obamacare and it's
presence that permits us to pursue law enforcement objectives, intelligence objectives, military objectives, and so much more. so it's not just about us sitting around and say, you know, do we really want our diplomats at risk? it's ok, what are the equities of the rest of the government that would be effective if we decided we had to close shop because the risk was too great? i want to stress that because i don't think you can understand, at least from my perspective, how difficult the calculation is without knowing that it's not just about the state department and usaid. secondly, i don't think we can retreat from these hard places. we have to harden our security presence but we can't retreat. we've got to be there. we've got to be picking up intelligence information, building relationships and if we had a whole table of some of our most experienced ambassadors sitting here today, they would be speaking with a loud chorus, you know, yes, help us be secure but don't shut us down, don't keep us behind high walls in bunkers so we can't get out and figure out what's going on. that's the balan
requirements. for example, to become a law, a bill must pass both houses of congress identical, then it's subject to the president's veto power, and then, of course, there's always the courts and the supreme court to rule on the constitutionality of legislation. the senate itself is a check on pure majority rule. as james madison said again, the use -- and this is to quote madison -- "the use of the senate is to consist in its proceeding with more coolness, with more system, with more wisdom than the popular branch," meaning the house of representatives. to achieve this person, sphrins the smallest states -- from the smallest states which the same number of representatives from the largest states, which i dmentd on earlier. further, senators are elected every six years, not every two years. these are ample to protect minority rights and to restrain pure majority rule. what is not necessary, what was never intended is an extra constitutional empowerment of the minority through a de facto requirement that a supermajority of senators be needed to even consider a bill or nominee, let alone
senator for law and justice. pastor is a e.d. be a dean any's sense was handed down by one of iran's most notorious judges to be carried out in one of the country's most brutal prisons. now there are growing concerns about whether he will ever make it back home safely to the united states shannon bream is live in washington. what's the latest on this case? >> family and friends of the pastor fear his life and death 8 year sentence in one of the most dangerous prisons. born in iran but has american citizenship with doing work with orphanage in iran when he was arrested last summer. accord to the american center for law and justice which has been fighting to get him released he was sentenced without warning for threatening national security because of his work with christian house churches in iran jordan of the acl has been representing the families pastor recently sent a disturbing letter from jail. prisoner there's every day. second, they won't even give that to him. because the nurse at the hospital for the national security criminal, he is too unclean as if like a cass system because is
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